Ys IX: Monstrum Nox

Ys IX: Monstrum Nox, the newest addition to the action-adventure RPG series Ys from Nihon Falcom, was announced today during their shareholder meeting. The game is set to release in 2019.

Ys IX takes place in Barduk or “prison city”, located in the Glia Ertlingen region to the northeast of Esteria. This story is based on mysterious people with unusual powers known as Monstra. The focus of the story? Mysteries hidden in the prison.

Along with elements from earlier Ys titles, Ys IX: Monstrum Nox will include “Superpower Actions”, allowing you to use the Monstra’s special abilities to explore the world and the environment. The prison city comes with another feature called the Guild Management.

Becoming someone that is not yourself. Have you ever seen that dream?
I am thinking inside that dream. Is this myself or not?
Is the dream a reality, or is the reality a dream? The answer that I finally arrived at is terribly simple.
“Either way is good, isn’t it”
It’s not a matter of which one is the truth. Both of them are truths.

~Text from “Barduk’s Cage”

Have a look at some screenshots –

Ys IX: Monstrum Nox

Ys IX: Monstrum Nox

Ys IX: Monstrum Nox

Ys IX: Monstrum Nox

Ys IX: Monstrum Nox

 

 

What is a Monstrum?

According to Wikipedia,

A monstrum is a sign or portent that disrupts the natural order as evidence of divine displeasure. The word monstrum is usually assumed to derive, as Cicero says, from the verb monstro, “show” (compare English “demonstrate”), but according to Varro it comes from moneo, “warn.” Because a sign must be startling or deviant to have an impact, monstrum came to mean “unnatural event” or “a malfunctioning of nature.” Suetonius said that “a monstrum is contrary to nature <or exceeds the nature> we are familiar with, like a snake with feet or a bird with four wings.” The Greek equivalent was teras. The English word “monster” derived from the negative sense of the word. Compare miraculum, ostentum, portentum, and prodigium. In one of the most famous uses of the word in Latin literature, the Augustan poet Horace calls Cleopatra a fatale monstrum, something deadly and outside normal human bounds. Cicero calls Catiline monstrum atque prodigium and uses the phrase several times to insult various objects of his attacks as depraved and beyond the human pale. For Seneca, the monstrum is, like tragedy, “a visual and horrific revelation of the truth.”

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